Spray-On Technique Could Bring Carbon Nanotubes to Retailers’ Shelves

Carbon nanotubes appear to be getting back some of their glory—after seemingly being eclipsed by graphene—with the news yesterday that an entire computer could be made from the material.  Now researchers at Technische Universität München (TUM) in Germany are continuing the carbon nanotube comeback with a new, inexpensive process that promises to enable their use in a wide range of applications including electronic skin and sensors integrated into food packaging.

The process, which involves simply spraying the carbon nanotubes onto a flexible, plastic substrate, is described in the journal Carbon (“Fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films on flexible substrates by spray deposition and transfer printing”)

Continue reading

Advertisements

Nanostructured Ceramic Coatings Enable the Potential of Thermophotovoltaics

The concept of the thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device has been around for more than 50 years.  In that time, its promise of a theoretical conversion efficiency of over 80 percent has been a tantalizing improvement over the still meek conversion efficiencies found in the average commercially available single-junction, silicon-based solar cells that reach just 15 percent.

Despite their theoretical promise, TPV devices haven’t been able to achieve much higher than 8 percent conversion efficiency. The problem has been that the thermal emitter (one of the two main components that make up a TPV device, the other being the photovoltaic diode) has yet to be made of a material that can withstand the temperatures required to make it effective.

Continue reading