Graphene Becomes Magnetic for First Time By Dexter Johnson

Researchers from both the University of Madrid Complutense and Universidad Autonoma working together at the IMDEA-Nanociencia Institute in Spain have for the first time given graphene magnetic properties,opening up the potential that the material can find new applications in future spintronic devices.

Unlike electronics in which an electron’s charge-carrying capabilities are exploited to create circuits, spintronics involves the quantum mechanical property of electrons to spin, which creates a magnetic moment that makes the electrons behave briefly like magnets. When in the presence of a magnetic field the spin of the electrons moves either into a parallel or antiparallel position in relation to the field. This positioning can be translated into a binary signal (1 or 0).

The trials and tribulations trying to make graphene applicable to electronics despite its lack of an inherent band gap have been well documented. However, what many have overlooked in the quest to bring graphene to electronics is that it doesn’t really lend itself very well to spintronics either.

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Nanowire Transistors Could Keep Moore’s Law Alive by Alexander Hellemans

Gate-All-Around Transistors In a new design, the transistor channel is made up of an array of vertical nanowires. The gate surrounds all the nanowires, which improves its ability to control the flow of current. Platinum-based source and drain contacts sit at the top and bottom of the nanowires.
Illustration: Emily Cooper
Gate-All-Around Transistors: In a new design, the transistor channel is made up of an array of vertical nanowires. The gate surrounds all the nanowires, which improves its ability to control the flow of current. Platinum-based source and drain contacts sit at the top and bottom of the nanowires.

The end of Moore’s Law has been predicted again and again. And again and again, new technologies, most recently FinFETs, have dispelled these fears. Engineers may already have come up with the technology that will fend off the next set of naysayers: nanowire FETs (field-effect transistors).

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